Organize data exchange with Mule ESB — KT.team

Share data with Mule ESB

Share data with Mule ESB

Mule ESB is an enterprise service bus that allows you to integrate with systems and organize data exchange between them with minimal development costs.

What tasks can you do with Mule ESB

1

Organization of data flows

between different information systems.

2

Scaling the architecture

at no additional cost: starting by “combining” just a few systems, eventually expand the functionality of the enterprise service bus by adding more and more services and systems to it.

3

Sharing data exchange

between applications to the transport layer and the business logic layer. The result is a simplified support and modernization of the project's IT infrastructure.

4

Changing the logic of interaction

services and applications using a graphic editor — without involving developers and spending time on additional development.

Mule ESB features

1

Creating and hosting services

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
Creating and hosting services on Mule ESB — KT.team

Mule Studio makes it possible to build integration solutions using a special studio (graphic editor). Mule Studio helps you design all kinds of components for integration solutions: connectors, transformers, routers, processors — and visualize their interconnection. Components can be combined and combined into flows of information into external systems.

2

Systems and applications management

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
Manage systems and applications with Mule ESB — KT.team

The Mule ESB service bus provides the ability to monitor event statuses and receive messages when problems occur. The Message Flow Analyzer app from Mule allows you to quickly respond to problems and see project KPIs. You can restrict access to the control panel according to the specified roles of employees.

3

Separating business logic from message nuances

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
In Mule ESB, business logic is separated from message nuances— KT.team

The Mule ESB service bus allows services not to waste time defining message formats from services and message delivery protocols. This makes it possible to separate the business logic of services from protocols and message formats, quickly develop integrations and coordinate work.

4

Routing and data exchange

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
Message routing and data exchange in Mule ESB — KT.team

Set rules or share data with Mule ESB. If necessary, data streams can be filtered by specified parameters, combined and reordered. With the Mule service bus, you can deliver both synchronous and asynchronous events, transactions, and data streams.

5

Data conversion

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
Converting data between formats in Mule ESB — KT.team

The standard situation on the project: each system uses its own data transfer format (for example, some have XML files, others have JSON) and their transformations (for example, in “1C” the color is “red”, and on the site you need to specify “#FF0000” or “red”). But when integrating, it is necessary to set up data exchange between systems, taking into account the specifics of each connection. Mule ESB allows you to graphically define rules for converting data from one format to another.

Is there a need for implementation?

Contact us and we will calculate the time and cost of implementing the ESB system

Mule ESB benefits

Scalability

As an enterprise service bus, Mule is designed to take into account the need for horizontal scaling. Mule ESB provides JUnit support, which makes it possible to create repeatable unit tests for integrations and immediately incorporate them into a continuous build.

Single information field

The Mule ESB service bus makes it possible to create a single information space for the entire IT infrastructure of the project and organize data flows between systems and applications.

On-premises and/or cloud solution to choose from

Both local and cloud deployments have their pros and cons. Mule ESB can work with any of these approaches, including a hybrid one. Moreover, regardless of the deployment method, there is no need to learn new instructions or refine the code by developers.

ESB system implementation cases

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Is there a need for implementation?

Contact us and we will calculate the time and cost of implementing the ESB system

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System integration calculator (ESB)

System Integration Project (ESB) Calculator

How many streams will the systems send
Example: The “Product Management System” will send product data. “Order Management System” — about orders. “Warehouse management system” — about the status of the shipment. This is 3 streams.
0
Example: The “Product Management System” will send product data. “Order Management System” — about orders. “Warehouse management system” — about the status of the shipment. This is 3 streams.
0
100
How many streams will the system receive
Example: The “Warehouse Management System” will receive data on goods and orders. “Order Management System” — about goods and shipment status. This is 4 streams.
0
Example: The “Warehouse Management System” will receive data on goods and orders. “Order Management System” — about goods and shipment status. This is 4 streams.
0
100
The calculator calculates using an accurate but simplified formula. The scope of work for your project and the final cost may vary. The final calculation will be made by your personal manager.

1

Calculation example

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team
Creating and hosting services on Mule ESB — KT.team

To transfer data between systems, we create a “stream”. Some streams are needed to send data, while others are needed to receive data. Orders, goods, or other entities may be transferred in a separate stream.

For example, on the diagram:
1. The “Merchandise Management System” sends goods. “Warehouse management system” is the fact that an order has been shipped. “Order Management System” — orders. In total, the systems will send 3 streams;

2. The Warehouse Management System accepts goods and orders. “Order management system” — goods and the fact that the order has been shipped. In total, the systems will receive 4 streams.

2

Scope of work in the calculator

Learn more about Mule ESB features — KT.team

Included in the calculation

Additionally

Preparing a map of systems and data flows (SOA scheme)

Preparing the infrastructure for connectors to operate

Development of object logic (connector business process diagram)

Setting up a monitoring and logging loop

Creating connectors for exchanging data for each stream on 3 stands (test, preprod, prod)

Creating connectors (storage - receiver) for exchanging data on each high-load stream (>100 messages per minute) on 3 stands (test, preprod, prod)

Set up to three dashboards per connector within a ready-made monitoring circuit

Over 15 attributes per stream

Documentation on copying integration, reusing, and maintaining

Demonstration of the implemented functionality

Included into account

Preparing a map of systems and data flows (SOA scheme)

Development of object logic (connector business process diagram)

Creating connectors (source - storage, storage - receiver) for exchanging data on each object on 3 stands (test, preprod, prod)

Set up to three dashboards per connector within a ready-made monitoring circuit

Over 15 attributes per object

Additionally

Preparing the infrastructure for connectors to operate

Setting up a monitoring and logging loop

Creating connectors (storage - receiver) for exchanging data on each high-load object (>100 messages per minute) on 3 stands (test, preprod, prod)

Over 15 attributes per object

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